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Thursday, 28 January 2021
Desert research leads to master’s degree

Liezl Maritz, who is graduating with a Master's degree in Biological Sciences, worked in isolation on the coast of the southern Namib desert and had black-backed jackals as her companions observing her doing her research. She was doing the first investigation ever into the ecological viability of wetland marine ponds created by diamond-mining activities.

Publication Date:
Wed, 09 Dec 2020 - 16:45
Food and clean water start with soil biodiversity: learning more about it is urgent

Dr Charlene Janion-Scheepers, from the Department of Biological Sciences, looks at how soils are vital for agriculture, biodiversity and clean water and describes how this below-ground world is often overlooked. She examines how the loss of life below the ground due to intensification of agriculture, climate change, erosion and compaction, among other things, is one of the biggest global threats to soils.

Publication Date:
Wed, 09 Dec 2020 - 12:15
Sensing good vibrations: a remarkable sensory organ in the beaks of ancient fossil birds

Newly published research by an all-women team from the University of Cape Town shows how one of the most ancient groups of birds (from the time of the dinosaurs) was able to detect minute mechanical vibrations in the soil using their beaks. PhD student Carla du Toit from the Department of Biological Sciences is the lead author, Professor Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan is co-author and leading dinosaur palaeontologist and Dr. Susan Cunningham is senior author and avian sensory ecology specialist.  

Publication Date:
Thu, 03 Dec 2020 - 17:45
The opportunity presented by the call for decolonization

Dr Margaret Blackie, from Stellenbosch University, presented the Department of Chemistry Transformation Committee lecture, with a talk entitled, "The opportunity presented by the call for decolonization ".

Publication Date:
Thu, 03 Dec 2020 - 17:30

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