loading

News

Monday, 26 October 2020
Shari Daya on decolonising Geography

South Africa’s higher education system needs to decolonise the discipline of geography. The establishment of the discipline, its histories, disclose its origins as “indubitably imperialist”. The discipline was part of a colonial project of cartography, exploration and knowledge.

Shari Daya recently reflected on the state of the discipline in a piece in the South African Journal of Science On shaky ground: A response to Long, D, Dalu, MS, Lembani, RL and Gunter, A (2019) Shifting sands: The decoloniality of geography and its curriculum in South Africa. She was interested to engage with existing debates on decolonisation to clarify some of the troublesome concepts and to suggest ways to move the process forward.

Publication Date:
Tue, 06 Oct 2020 - 10:30
Enlarge the reach of science through all our languages

Human evolution in South Africa has a long hominin fossil history record dating back 3.6 million years, as well as a rich palaeontological record that includes the earliest dinosaurs. But only two of South Africa’s national languages are fully able to scientifically describe the richness of this history. But young black scientists are challenging this – and changing the colonial narrative.

Publication Date:
Tue, 06 Oct 2020 - 10:15
UCT-built app to support babies in need of breast milk

UCT computer science students have developed and are now upgrading an app for Cape Town-based human milk bank Milk Matters

Publication Date:
Tue, 15 Sep 2020 - 11:30
Digital interventions to address maternal and child health challenges

Some of the world’s leading scientists representing universities in South Africa and the United Kingdom have joined forces. They will help under-resourced communities develop information and communication technology (ICT) interventions geared towards breaking down barriers and exploring solutions to some of South Africa’s critical maternal and child health (MCH) challenges.

The Co-designing Community-based ICTs Interventions for Maternal and Child Health (CoMaCH) network in South Africa is a cross-collaboration involving inter- and transdisciplinary research, led by Dr Nervo Verdezoto from the School of Computer Science and Informatics at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom (UK) and Dr Melissa Densmore, a senior lecturer in computer science at the University of Cape Town (UCT).

Publication Date:
Mon, 07 Sep 2020 - 13:45

Pages

TOP